New KB articles published for the week ending 29th June,2019

VMware Cloud on AWS Dell EMC Avamar 19.1 for VMware Cloud on AWS Date Published: 27-Jun-19 VMware NSX-T Unable to add a L2VPN stretched Logical Switch to a Logical Router Date Published: 23-Jun-19 VMware NSX-T Data Center NSX-T upgrade on ESXi hosts fails at 40% in environments running containers Date Published: 28-Jun-19 VMware PKS How

The post New KB articles published for the week ending 29th June,2019 appeared first on VMware Support Insider.

Posted in KB Digest, Knowledge Base | Comments Off on New KB articles published for the week ending 29th June,2019

New KB articles published for the week ending 22nd June,2019

Datacenter Database compatibility and upgrade path for VMware Products Date Published: 22-Jun-19 VMware Horizon Add Registry settings for Wan Optimization for USB redirected Wacom signature pad devices Date Published: 17-Jun-19 VMware Horizon Client for Mac OS X The Yubikey smart card authentication does not work when connecting to remote agent Date Published: 17-Jun-19 VMware Horizon

The post New KB articles published for the week ending 22nd June,2019 appeared first on VMware Support Insider.

Posted in KB Digest, Knowledge Base | Comments Off on New KB articles published for the week ending 22nd June,2019

Unable to query vSphere health information. Check vSphere Client logs for details.

Advertise here with BSA


After an upgrade from 6.5 U1 to 6.5 U2 a customer received the following error in vCenter: Unable to query vSphere health information. Check vSphere Client logs for details. They looked at the log files but couldn’t get an indication of what was wrong. In this case, it was pretty simple, one of the required services wasn’t started for whatever reason. You can verify this in the vCenter Appliance VAMI (management interface for the appliance), which can be accessed by going to “http://ip-of-vcenter:5480”. When logged in you have to check the Services section, and make sure the VMware Analytics Services is running, as shown in the screenshot below.

The post Unable to query vSphere health information. Check vSphere Client logs for details. appeared first on Yellow Bricks.

Posted in 6.5, 6.5 u1, 6.5 u2, Server, vCenter, vcsa | Comments Off on Unable to query vSphere health information. Check vSphere Client logs for details.

Finally! A VVols customer case study

I wrote an update on VVols adoption a few months ago and predicted 2019 would be the year that VVols adoption would accelerate due to a number of reasons. One key thing I called out that is critical to any new technology going mainstream is the need for customer case studies as most customers (non-early …

Continue reading »

Posted in News | Comments Off on Finally! A VVols customer case study

CloudSpot brings you vCloud Director!

Welcome to another episode of Cloud Spot

This week – vCloud Director!

 

 

Before I start let’s get the chant out the way:

LONG LIVE vCLOUD DIRECTOR!

LONG LIVE vCLOUD DIRECTOR!

Mantra done!? That feels a lot better…..

 

Welcome to episode 4 of CloudSpot, and this week I will be talking to John Dwyer about vCloud Directors’ history and future. It’s been a long journey for vCloud Director, coming back from the brink of existence to the extremely strong corner stone of the VMware Cloud Provider Program Strategy.

John brings a long history with vCloud Director from past employments and has a great understanding of service provider requirements having built platforms in the past. We will discuss some of the great new aspects of vCloud Director and look at the future role that vCloud Director plays in the VMware Cloud Provider future.

How do I get access to Cloudspot?

The podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, ZenCast & Spotify – search for “Cloudspot” or click over to our website: http://www.cloudspotpodcast.com.

As usual, if you would like to provide feedback or suggestions for the podcast please email [email protected]

 

The post CloudSpot brings you vCloud Director! appeared first on VMware Cloud Provider Blog.

Posted in Cloud Services, podcast, VMware Cloud Provider | Comments Off on CloudSpot brings you vCloud Director!

CloudHealth by VMware now available to VMware MSPs through VMware Cloud Provider Hub!

CloudHealth by VMware now available to VMware MSPs through VMware Cloud Provider Hub!

VMware is excited to announce the general availability of CloudHealth by VMware on the VMware Cloud Provider Hub! This will be available to partners globally through the Managed Service Provider (MSP) model under the VMware Cloud Provider Program.

The MSP model under the VMware Cloud Provider Program (VCPP) enables partners to leverage SaaS offerings to broaden their technology portfolio and wrap these solutions with unique managed services, without having to invest in additional data center resources. The MSP model enables partners to benefit from faster time-to-market and consolidate operations and billings.

VMware Cloud Provider Hub is a platform that VMware MSP partners use to transact, deploy and provision VMware as-a-service offerings. The Cloud Provider Hub brings a new level of speed and simplicity to expanding MSP services for VMware Cloud Providers. CloudHealth joins our existing offerings VMware Cloud on AWS and VMware Log Intelligence on Cloud Provider Hub.

What is CloudHealth?

CloudHealth is a multi-cloud management platform that enables ends users and partners to analyze, optimize, and govern multi-cloud operations from a single pane of glass. A platform for management, operations, and service delivery, the CloudHealth Partner Platform provides a centralized console to simplify customer management and streamline billing to deliver value added services.

It provides the ability to isolate customer usage and cost for internal reporting needs and set unique pricing, while giving branded access to the platform as a value-added service to customers. Partners are able to improve efficiency, monetize their public cloud business, and increase margins.

The CloudHealth Partner Platform was specifically designed to help MSPs offer superior cloud management services, address a rapidly expanding industry opportunity and boost profitability. CloudHealth works with MSPs to help accelerate their ability to extend their service portfolio and bring strategic cloud services to market quicker to address multi-cloud requirements.

What is the value that MSPs derive from CloudHealth?

Businesses seek support with cloud migrations, infrastructure design, security and ongoing support. Partners provide critical value to businesses grappling with these and other commonplace cloud challenges related to complexity and scale. MSPs are able to leverage CloudHealth in order to become the next generation of service providers, benefitting from recommendations and best practices for packaging up and selling managed cloud services, full health checks, and reserved instance management. Furthermore, CloudHealth can help partners align to industry frameworks and pass MSP audits to obtain accreditation with AWS and Azure.

Why is this important for customers and partners?

Every organization is on a multi-cloud journey. As customers are now embracing multi-cloud driven by diverse and evolving business needs, VMware Cloud Providers are trusted advisors for customers in their cloud journey. The VMware Cloud Provider Program is a key pillar to the VMware Cloud strategy, representing more than 4,200 partners in more than 120 countries that are delivering services using VMware Cloud solutions. Collectively, VCPP partners serve more than 150,000 customers with millions of VMs deployed. Customers can benefit from a robust, differentiated set of enterprise-class clouds using the latest VMware innovations to simplify hybrid cloud adoption and management with consistent infrastructure and new cloud services.

With the new innovations such as CloudHealth, cloud providers are better able to capture the industry opportunity for multi-cloud managed services. With CloudHealth, partners can create managed services to support customers adopting a multi-cloud strategy inclusive of non-VMware based clouds. By adopting new solutions such as CloudHealth, VMware Cloud Providers enhance their position as trusted cloud advisor to customers by addressing the complexity of multi-cloud management.

How can I learn more about CloudHealth on Cloud Provider Hub?

Please visit our VMware Cloud Provider Hub website to learn more on how you can sign up for the CloudHealth on Cloud Provider Hub including

 

The post CloudHealth by VMware now available to VMware MSPs through VMware Cloud Provider Hub! appeared first on VMware Cloud Provider Blog.

Posted in Cloud Provider, Cloud Services, VCPP, VMware Cloud Provider, VMware Cloud Provider Program | Comments Off on CloudHealth by VMware now available to VMware MSPs through VMware Cloud Provider Hub!

vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Post Deployment Configuration

vcloud availabilityNow that we have vCloud Availability (vCAv) installed and running. The last thing we will want to do is prepare it for production by making some post deployment provider configuration changes. First, it is important to note when linking vCAv with vCloud Director 9.5 and earlier, the default behavior is to expose the extension to all users. This can lead to confusion on behalf of the customer so our recommendation is to disable the extension globally and only enable it for the customers subscribing to the service. The other change that will need to be made is to install your signed certificate.

1. Customer access

As mentioned in the introduction, the default behavior for vCloud Availability when linking with vCloud Director 9.5 and earlier is to expose the extension globally. To avoid customer confusion, we recommend disabling the extension globally, post deployment, and only exposing the extension to customers who are subscribing to the service. This is an API driven process that is broken down into four key steps. I will not go into detail, as I have written a blog that walks you through the steps to manage the extension. For more information on managing the extension, please check out this blog

In vCloud Director 9.7, extensions are managed via the plugin manager. To get to the plugin manager, navigate to Main Menu → Customize Portal → Manage Plugins. Once in the plugin manager, you will see all of the loaded plugins and how they are scoped.

vcloud director plugins vcloud availability

In our particular instance, you will see that the vCloud Availability extension is scoped for both the provider and the tenant. What we need to validate is which tenants it has been scoped for. To see, and edit, which tenants have access to the Availability plugin, click the checkbox next to vCloud Availability and select the Publish option in the menu across the top. This will pop up a modal that will allow you to select where to publish the extension. By default, the extension will be set to publish to all tenants. You will want to click on this box to disable it globally and select on the tenants you want to have access to the service. Once you have selected the appropriate tenants, click Save.

2. Certificates

Before we dig into the process for updating certificates, it is important to understand what role they play. When we talk about vCloud Availability, the service is really comprised of three appliances: the Cloud Manager, the Replicator, and the Tunnel. Certificates play a crucial role in the appliances. Not only are they used for the management interface, they also use for host validation when communicating. This is important to understand as it will have an impact on your approach to certificate management. The first inclination is to replace all certificates on all hosts. This is acceptable if you are using host specific certs on each of the appliances. Where the problem lies, is when you try to use the same key and certificate (i.e. wildcard certificate) on all of the hosts. Because the certificates are not only used for the management interface, but also the communication between the hosts, using the same wildcard cert causes failures. Since customers only interact with the Cloud Manager, this is the only certificate that needs to be replaced by a publicly signed certificate. Since the certificates for the tunnel and replicator are used for the communication chain and management interface which are only accessible via the provider, the need to change these certificates is dictated by company policy.

But wait, doesn’t the user interface with the tunnel? And doesn’t that mean it will need a publicly signed certificate as well? Yes and No. This can get a little confusing, so let me try to do my best to explain. When setting up the on-premises appliance, the tenant will provide the hostname or IP address of tunnel. But, when the user actually connections, what the user will see is the certificate coming from the Cloud Manager, not the tunnel.

vcloud availability certificate

Example values:

Common Name: vcav.provider.net
Organization: Provider
Fingerprint: SHA256 Fingerprint=7D:C3:BA:76:16:D1:1B:43:A8:CD:AF:82:87:6D:28:42:E1:0E:98:5C:7F:4F:97:5C:16:38:89:25:B1:08:4A:7E

The tunnel is not only providing the encryption layer between the two sites, but it is also behaving as a TCP proxy. So, as requests come across, the tunnel will forward the request to the appropriate resource. (i.e. replication traffic will be forwarded to the replicators and management traffic will be forwarded to to the Cloud Manager). Since the tunnel is also a proxy for the Cloud Manager, this is why the only required public certificate needs to be placed on the Cloud Manager.

Now that is clear as mud, let’s talk about how to update the certificate on the Cloud Manager. There is a lot of documentation out there on generating keys and certificate signing requests (CSRs) and depending on your company policy, you may have different requirements. As I walk through this process, I won’t go too in-depth, but I will try to call out certain options which can be problematic, such as subject alternative names (SAN). Although SANs are not required for a valid certificate, in an environment such as ours where the internal hostname may not match the publicly accessible hostname, using SAN will help ensure the certificate passes validity tests. Also, certain browsers, such a Google Chrome, are starting to require SANs to be marked as valid certificates.

2.1. Generate certificate signing request

To create a certificate for the Cloud Manager, The first thing you will want to do is generate a key and certificate signing request for the host. To do this, you will need a machine running openssl. Although a subject alternative name is not a requirement for the certificate to have the value applied, it is best practice to provide all pertinent information to your certificate authority. Because of this, we will create a configuration file called req.conf with the following information:

req.conf
[req]
        distinguished_name = req_distinguished_name
        req_extensions = v3_req
        prompt = no
        [req_distinguished_name]
        C = US
        ST = VA
        L = SomeCity
        O = MyCompany
        OU = MyDivision
        CN = www.company.com
        [v3_req]
        keyUsage = keyEncipherment, dataEncipherment
        extendedKeyUsage = serverAuth
        subjectAltName = @alt_names
        [alt_names]
        DNS.1 = www.company.com
        DNS.2 = company.com
        IP.1 = 172.16.0.99
        IP.2 = 8.8.8.8

Once this file has been created, we will create a private key and certificate signing request in one step with the following command:

openssl req -new -out <hostname>.csr -newkey rsa:2048 -nodes -sha256 -keyout <hostname>.key -config req.conf

Once you have generated your signing request you may want to review it. To view your csr, use the following command:

openssl req -in mycsr.csr -noout -text

Once you have validated your CSR and everything looks good, submit your CSR to your certificate authority.

2.2. Validate certificate

Once you have received the certificate back from the certificate authority, the next thing you will want to do is validate the certificate and ensure the Subject Alternative Names have been appropriately configured. To view the certificate in plain text, run the following command:

openssl x509 -noout -text -in <certificate>

In running this command, the certificate will be output in plain text and you should see a X509v3 Subject Alternative Name field with all of the provided values in the CSR.

2.3. Converting the certificate

Most certificates will be provide back to you as a .pem or .crt file. vCloud Availability is using a Java keystore so it you will need to convert this certificate to a pksc12 format. Doing this is really simple. Upload the certificate to the same directory where you generated your private key and csr. Once uploaded, run the following:

openssl pkcs12 -export -in <certificate> -inkey <key> -out <hostname>.pfx

This will create the certificate bundle necessary to upload to the cloud manager. It is also important to provide a password when generating this file in order to protect your private key.

2.4. Uploading

The final step is to upload the certificate bundle to the Cloud Manager. First ensure the certificate bundle is located on the same machine you will be using to configure the Cloud Manager. Next, log into the Cloud Manger at https://<cloud manager>/ui/admin and navigate to Configuration → Appliance Settings → Certificate. Once there, click import. A modal will pop up allowing you to import your certificate bundle.

upload vcloud availability certificate

The password will be the password you assigned in the previous step. Click browse and locate the certificate bundle. Once complete click apply. After doing this, you will be logged out and the service restarted. After a few minutes, you will be able to log back in with the newly applied certificate.

3. Remote administration

In vCloud Availability 3.0.1 a new security feature was added that restricts the source address that exercise certain API endpoints. If this feature is enabled, which is recommended, other cloud sites won’t be able to run pairing, or repairing, operations for the given site.

vcloud availability remote administration

4. Default policies

As new tenants are provisioned they are assigned to the default policy. Out of the box, the default policy is set to prohibit replications in either direction. If a user is tenant is assigned to a policy that does not allow for replication in either direction, they will not be able to pair their on-prem appliance with the service and will receive a resulting error. As a default behavior, this isn’t necessarily a bad idea, it is just important to be aware of.

vcloud availability provider deployment default policies

As a result, it will be important to have at least one policy in place that allows for replication post deployment. To create a new policy, Navigate to Policies in the left navigation menu and select New. This will pop up a modal that will allow you to define the details of the policy. These can be leveraged to on a tenant by tenat basis, or can be be defined based on a tiering structure (Gold, Silver, Bronze, etc). The values that are defined will be the smallest values that can be set by the tenant.

vcloud availability policy configuration

As an example, if we set a policy that allows for 10 retained instances, and a 30 minute RPO, a tenant assigned to the policy will not be able to configure more than 10 instances for a given VM/vAPP, but can configure less (i.e. five retained instances) and the minimum RPO will be 30 minutes or more (i.e. two hours).

It is also important to note that only one policy can be assigned to a tenant.

5. Post deployment – Conclusion

Now that the provider environment has been deployed and configured, in our next blog, we will focus on deploying the tenant appliance and pairing to provider

Please feel free to review other articles related to the vCloud Availability blogs series:
1. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Introduction
2. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Installation
3. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Post Deployment Configuration
4. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Tenant Installation
5. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Tenant Post Deployment Configuration
5. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Managing vCloud Availability Access
6. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Cloud Access, Ownership, and Visibility

Additional Resources

The post vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Post Deployment Configuration appeared first on VMware Cloud Provider Blog.

Posted in API, Cloud Migration, Cloud Services, Disaster Recovery, Hybrid Cloud, vCloud Availability, vCloud Director, VMware Cloud Provider, VMware Cloud Provider Platform | Comments Off on vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Post Deployment Configuration

vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Installation

 

Now that we have discussed some of the key features and architecture of vCloud Availability, it is time to install the service. In this blog we will discuss the provider installation of vCloud Availability by breaking the installation down into the following steps:

  • 1. Deploying Appliances
  • 2. Configuration
    • 2.1 Cloud Manager
    • 2.2 Replicators
    • 2.3 Tunnels
  • 3. Verify

vCloud Availability can be deployed in two ways. First, there is a consolidated appliance that contains all of the services. This method is good for labs or proof of concepts, but is not recommended for production environments. For production deployments, vCloud Availability will require three separate appliances with associated DNS entries. In this blog, we will focus on the production installation.

For simplicity, all of the appliances deployed in this guide will be deployed on the same VLAN, but it is important to ensure all communications paths are open between the appropriate appliances. See the the graphic below for port requirements:

1. Deploying Appliances

To begin the provider installation of vCloud Availability deployment, download the provider ova from my.vmware.com. Once you have downloaded the latest ova, log into vCenter and install the ova. During the installation wizard, you will select which appliance will be installed. This will need to be completed three times, once for each appliance (cloud replication manager, replicator, and tunnel). It is important to note that although Cloud Replication Management is a single appliance, it is actually composed of two services: Replication Manager and vApp Replication Manager (which includes the UI).

During the customization phase, the first options is to provide a password. This password is a temporary password and will be reset during the initial login and configuration. Select something simple and easy to remember. For most installations I use “1234.” Next, it is important to provide an NTP service to keep the appliances in sync so you will want to provide an NTP server. For the network configuration, this section can be left blank if using DHCP, but static IP assignments are preferred since we will be using DNS for the configuration and don’t want IP addresses changing and breaking the service.

2. Configuration

Once the provider installation of the appliances is complete, the next step is to configure the solution. As of vCloud Availability 3.0.1, a new feature, an installation checklist, has been introduced that will assist with the setup and configuration of the service. To access the checklist, start by logging into the vApp Replication Manager at https://<manager hostname>/ui/admin.

After logging in, the first thing you will be greeted with is a modal to change the password. Once the password has been changed, you will have the option of selecting the installation checklist or the setup wizard. The installation checklist will walk you through each step to install and configure the service. There are two checklists available. One for a consolidated deployment and one for production deployment. In a consolidated deployment where all services are running on the same appliance, all steps are validated as they are checked off. For a production deployment, this validation is currently not in place for all steps. Some steps will have to be manually checked off.

2.1. Cloud Manager (Replication Manager / vApp Replication Manager)

Once the appliances have been deployed and powered on ( steps 1, 2, and 3 ), the next step will be to configure the appliances. The first appliance to configure will be the Replication Manager. Open a new tab or window and browse to https://<manager hostname>:8441/ui/admin. If not using the checklist, this will be the first time logging into the appliance so you use the password that was used during deployment. Once logged in, you will be greeted with a modal to change the current password. If you are using the checklist and have already changed the password, you will use the configured password to log in.

Once logged in, the next step will be to configure the lookup service. Click on the link to configure the lookup service and provide the URL for the vCenter or PSC running the lookup service. If unsure, log into vCloud Director and navigate to Administration → Federation and there will be an option for vSphere Services. Under this option, you will see the hostname to use for the lookup service that will need to be configured for vCloud Availability. If, for some reason, vCloud Director does not have lookup services configured, you can also log into one of the vCenters that is registered with vCloud Director and run the following command:

root@vc-01 [ /usr/lib/vmware-vmafd/bin ]# ./vmafd-cli get-ls-location --server-name localhost

You can type in the hostname ( i.e. vcenter.local.net ) and the value will be converted to the correct URL, or you can type in the full lookup service URL ( https://vcenter.local.net/lookupservice/sdk ). It is important that the full URL be present before clicking okay. Keep this information as it will be required by all appliances. Also note that for vCenter 6.5 and newer, port 443 is acceptable. If you happen to be running vCenter 6.0 and earlier, you will have to use port 7444 when configuring the lookup service.

Once this is complete, the next step is to configure the vApp Replication Manager. To do this, browse to the same host as the previous step but without the 8441 ( https://<manager hostname>/ui/admin ). Once logged in, click on the link to run the initial setup wizard. This will guide you through the steps to configure the vApp Replication Manager. First, you will give the installation a site name. This is how this installation will be referenced in vCloud Director and vSphere. On this page, you will also set the Public API URL. This is NOT the hostname of the appliance. This is the public URL that users external to the environment will use to access the service from an external connection.

Example values:

Site name: CloudProvider
Public API endpoint: https: https://drass.provider.net ( FQDN that will be used to access the service remotely )

An important issue that needs to be pointed out here is the Public API endpoint. This URL is the URL that users will use to access the service. If you reference the port design earlier in the document, you will notice that although we are pointing to port 443, the service is actually running on port 8048. This means that there will need to be a destination NAT rule in the firewall that converts all traffic to the Public API endpoint from port 443 to port 8048. This was done intentionally to minimize the changes required on the client side to access the service.

Once this has been defined, next you will configure the lookup service. This will be the same lookup service we configured in the previous step.

Example values:

Lookup service address: https://vcenter.local.net/lookupservice/sdk ( should be the same lookup service from earlier steps )
SSO Admin Username: [email protected]
Password: password

Once the lookup service has been configured and authenticated, the next step is to configure the connection to vCloud Director. If vCloud Director has been properly configured in the lookup service, then it can be auto-configured. In this step, I prefer to enter the details manually to ensure I am pointing to the correct URL. When configuring, the URL must have /api appended. If this is left off, you will get an error. The username must follow the prescribed format of <user>@systemSystem is the root tenant and tells vCloud Director where the account resides.

Example values:

vCloud Director URL: https;//vcdlb.provider.net/api ( you will want to ensure you are pointing the requests to the vCD load balancer and not a single cell )
vCloud Director Username: [email protected]
vCloud Director Password: password

After authenticating to vCloud Director, the final few steps will be to apply a license key, configure CEIP, and click finish.

2.2. Replicators

Once the the Cloud Manager has been configured, the next step is to configure the replicator(s). Replicators are a scalable component. This means multiple replicators can be deployed to scale performance. With this in mind, this step will have to be repeated for each replicator. To do this browse to https://<tunnel hostname>/ui/admin. Since this is the first time logging into this appliance, use the password that was configured during deployment. As before, when you first log in, you will be greeted by a modal to change the password. Once the password has been changed, the next step will be to configure the lookup service. Clicking on the appropriate link and configure the lookup service.

Once the lookup service has been configured on each of the replicators, each replicator will have to be registered to the replication manager. Log into https://<manager hostname>:8441/ui/admin and select replicators in the navigation menu. Once on the replicator page, select new. A new modal will pop up to configure the replicator. Site should be populated with your current site information that was configured when deploying the vApp Replication Manager.  The API URL is the hostname or IP address of the replicator. Make sure to append :8043 ( you can also type in just the IP address and hit <tab> and the https and port will be added ). This is the port that the replicator runs on. For the appliance password, this will be the password that was set when configuring the replicator. Finally, enter the SSO credentials.

Example values:

Site: CloudProvider ( repopulated from previous step )
API URL: https://172.16.251.96:8043 ( IP address of current replicator )
Appliance Password: password
SSO Admin Username: [email protected]
SSO Password: password

Once the replicator has been configured, it should show up in the Replicators view with a green check next two it. It will also show up on the System Monitoring page.

2.3. Tunnels

Once all of the replicators have been configured and registered with the replication manager, the final steps are to configure and register the tunnel. The first step in configuring the tunnel is to browse to the tunnel at https://<tunnel hostname>/ui/admin. After setting the password, click edit next to the lookup service and enter the appropriate URL. Once the lookup service has been configured, the next step will be to log back into the vApp Replication Manager ( https://<manager hostname>/ui/admin ) and select Configuration from the navigation menu. Once on the configuration page, select Edit next to Tunnel Address. Next, click the checkbox to enable the tunnel. In the tunnel address enter the URL for the tunnel ( https://<tunnel hostname>:8047 ). Internally, the tunnel appliance communicates over port 8047, so please ensure the port is properly configured ( you can also type in just the IP address and hit <tab> and the https and port will be added ). Finally enter the appliance password that was configured.

Example values:

Tunnel address: https://172.16.251.97:8047
Password: password

Now that the tunnel has been configured, the final step will be to go back through each of the appliances and restart the services. To do this, log into each appliance and select System Monitoring in the menu on the left. In the pane on the right select Restart Service

Although it is not part of the core service a configuration step that often gets missed is the final step of configuring the inbound NAT on the firewall. This is required for customers to access the service. The recommendation is to create a destination NAT that translates port 443 to 8048. Once this is complete, the configuration of the service is complete and ready to be verified.

3. Verify

After the provider installation has been configured, there are a couple of things that can be done to validate the installation. First, log into the vApp Replication Manager at https://<manager hostname>/ui/login and navigate to the System Monitoring page. On this page you should see green checks next to everything. If you see red checks, those issues will need to be addressed.

The other thing that can be done to test the configuration, specifically the tunneling, is to navigate to the tunnel on port 8048 ( https://<tunnel hostname>:8048 ). If everything is configured properly and working as expected, you should get the login page for the vCloud Availability portal. Assuming this is working as expected, the last thing to check is the destination NAT. To do this open a browser and navigate to https://<Public API URL>. If the destination NAT is working, you should get the same login page as you did when accessing the tunnel internally.

The final step is to test access from vCloud Director. To do this, log into the vCloud Director H5. In the main menu, you will see the, newly installed, Availability plugin. Selecting this option will redirect you to vCloud Availability.

Conclusion

Now that we have the environment up and running, there are still a few more things that need to be configured before going into production. In the next blog, we will focus on the post deployment configuration options where we will address areas such as certificates, policies, and access.

Please feel free to review other articles related to the vCloud Availability blogs series:
1. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Introduction
2. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Installation
3. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Post Deployment Configuration
4. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Tenant Installation
5. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Tenant Post Deployment Configuration
6. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Managing vCloud Availability Access
7. vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Cloud Access, Ownership, and Visibility

Additional Resources

The post vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Installation appeared first on VMware Cloud Provider Blog.

Posted in Cloud Services, vCloud Availability, VMware Cloud Provider | Comments Off on vCloud Availability 3.0 Blog Series: Provider Installation

Top 25 VMworld US 2019 sessions to attend (or watch online)

Advertise here with BSA


I do this every year, list my favorite 25 VMworld sessions which you definitely should try to attend in person. Or if you are not going, watch online. Most of these sessions are by folks I know, or folks I have seen presenting, or topics which I find interesting for various reasons. Make sure to register for these sessions as soon as possible, as these are the sessions which tend to fill up extremely fast. I also have couple of sessions, 3 to be precise, make sure to register for those as well. You can find them through this link. HCI1870BU is the HA best practices for vSAN customers, HBI2186BU is the vSphere HA and DRS Hybrid Cloud Deep Dive which I will be presenting with Frank, and HCI3551KU is the HCI Keynote.

Now that I got that out of the way, let’s take a stab at my top 25, these are in random order! if your session is not on the list it is not because I think it was not good enough to be on there, it is because there are simply too many awesome sessions to select from. Here we go!

  1. 60 Minutes of Non-Uniform Memory Architecture [HBI2278BU] by Frank Denneman
    I am sure this session will go extremely deep, everything you always wanted to know (and more) about NUMA and vSphere. I don’t think I need to say much more.
  2. A Practitioner’s Guide to vCenter Server Architecture [HBI2227BU] by  Emad Younis and Sandeep Byreddy
    Of course, you don’t need to understand the vCenter Architecture to use vSphere, but we are all geeks, right? So this is probably the perfect session to understand more about the internals, services, modules etc.
  3. HCI Management: Current and Future [HCI1207BU] by Junchi Zhang and Christian Dickmann
    This is a great session where product management and engineering talk (and demo) new HCI management features. It typically contains at least 2-3 cool demos, and I watched the session previous years and it was well worth it.
  4. “If This Then That” for vSphere – The Power of Event-Driven Automation [HCI1379CU] by William Lam and Michael Gasch
    I found the abstract of this session very interesting, event-driven automation is definitely something that should of interest for most of you. And when it happens to have William and Michael speaking, you know you will be in for something good.
  5. Hyperconverged Infrastructure: Present and Future [HCI2733BU] by Vijay Ramachandran
    Another forward-looking session, this one by the VP of Product Management, and a bit more generic than the HCI Management session. Previous editions of this session showcased vSAN Data Protection for instance. So expect insights of what the future holds for vSAN/HCI.
  6. VMware CTO Panel: What’s Over the Horizon? [OCTO2899PU] by Ray O’Farrell, Pere Monclus, Greg Lavender and Christos Karamanolis
    The CTO panel has always been interesting, typically they will start with a discussion about where VMware stands and where VMware is going, followed by audience questions and deep (forward-looking) answers/statements. Very entertaining and worth the time!
  7. The Virtually Speaking Podcast Live: The Future of Storage [HCI1894PU] by Pete Flecha, John Nicholson, and Ken Werneburg
    A VMworld session which at the same time will be a live podcast, by your favorite podcast team. Not only are all three great speakers, I suspect they will have some amazing guests and I suspect it will be very entertaining at the same time.
  8. PowerCLI Deep Dive [HBI1729BU] by Kyle Ruddy and Luc Dekens
    These guys are the PowerCLI guru’s, if you want to get your mind blown and learn more about PowerCLI and automation, then this is the session to attend. I can guarantee that you will walk out with new ideas and knowledge.
  9. vSphere Virtual Volumes: Technical Deep Dive [HBI2853BU] by Jason Massae and Thiruvengada Govindan Thirumal
    Adoption of VVols is going up fast, and there’s a good reason for it. Find out what is so special about VVols and why you should consider it. Jason and Thiruvengada are experts on the topic, and will be able to go deep!
  10. VMware Cloud on AWS: SDDC Availability Deep Dive [HBI1924BU] by Jeremiah Megie and Glenn Sizemore
    VMware Cloud on AWS has some very appealing availability features which you won’t find anywhere else. Want to understand how VMware and AWS are working together to improve your uptime and resource availability? Make sure to attend this one by Glenn and Jeremiah!
  11. Zero to DR in 60 Minutes: VMware Site Recovery DRaaS Technical Deep Dive [HBI1229BU] by Stefan Tsonev and Cato Grace
    One of the use cases for public cloud, of course, is disaster recovery, in this session, Stefan and Cato will do a deep dive on the VMware DR as a Service solution.
  12. Extreme Performance Series
    Yes, I am cheating as this is actually 5 separate sessions, but these are simply a must attend/watch! I’ve learned a lot about vSphere internals over the past years by watching these sessions, they cover things like persistent memory, schedulers, best practices etc.
  13. How GPU-Assisted ML for Medical Research Proved to Be a Force for Good [HBI1546BU] by Niels Hagoort and Johan van Amersfoort
    Very interesting use case explained by Johan and Niels. They will discuss how a vSphere environment is used machine learning and deep learning. Worth attending!
  14. One Storage Platform for Thousands of Cloud Providers [HBI2537PU] by Ari Paul, Rawlinson Rivera, and John Toor
    In this session, they will discuss the availability of S3 compatible object storage in vCloud Director based platforms and the use cases. It will feature Rawlinson from Cohesity and John from Cloudian. Hosted by Ari Paul from VMware.
  15. Core Storage Best Practices: Ensuring Your Storage Is Reliable [HBI2751BU] by Jason Massae and Cody Hosterman
    This session has been in the top VMworld sessions for the past couple of years. Jason and Cody have a wealth of knowledge to share with you on the topic of core storage (VMFS, NFS, VAAI etc)
  16. Optimizing vSAN for Performance [HCI1757BU] by Paudie O’Riordan
    Paudie is one of the most technical guys in our team, if anyone understands vSAN (and performance) inside out it is him. Make sure to attend this one to get a good understanding of how to tweak vSAN to get the best performance out of it.
  17. Showcase Keynote: Hybrid Cloud Architecture – The New Standard from the Data Center [HYB3544KU] by Kit Colbert, Raghu Raghuram and Mark Lohmeyer
    I always enjoy these showcases as they discuss what we have today, but more importantly what is coming in the future. Kit, Raghu and Mark are excellently equipped to bring you up to speed!
  18. vSphere Networking in the Data-Centric Future [HBI2136BU] by Sudhansu Jain and Disha Chopra
    I am not a networking guy, but this sounds very interesting as in this session the future of networking will be discussed. What are the current trends, where is the market moving towards?
  19. Innovations in vMotion: Features, Performance, and Best Practices [HBI1421BU] by Sreekanth Setty and Arunachalam Ramanathan
    vMotion is the most used vSphere feature, and it continues to evolve. Over the years the vMotion innovations/futures session has always been very interesting, and I suspect it will be again this year!
  20. VMware Cloud on Dell EMC: Technical Deep Dive [HBI1975BU] by Mike Hall and Sridevi Ravuri
    This session will provide a deep dive on what was formerly called Project Dimension. A very interesting concept where VMware and Dell will join forces to deliver and manage an SDDC as a Service on premises.
  21. Encrypting VMs on Standalone Hosts: Tech Preview [HBI1947BU] by Mike Foley and Samyuktha Subramanian
    A session title with “tech preview” always has my interest! In this session they will also be discussing very interesting use cases for this potential future feature.
  22. Diversity and Inclusion Tech Panel: You Can Drive Success for Women in Tech [PD2632U] by Jodi Shely
    An interesting topic, and an important topic as well, definitely one I will be attending or watching!
  23. Accelerating Intra-Host PVRDMA Storage Traffic in a Future Dell AMD Server [OCTO2718BU] by Richard Brunner and Shyamkumar Iyer
    I’ve attended various sessions by Richard, and they are always excellent and very deep and typically forward-looking. I know this one will also be, and I am sure they will go deep fast!
  24. Edge Computing Innovations in Office of the CTO and Dell Technologies [EIOT2715BU] by Chris Wolf and Daniel Beveridge
    This session was one of my favorite sessions last year, although the title has slightly changed, I am sure it will be packed with cool demos, industry insights, and futures!
  25. How to Become the Platform Engineer of the Future [PD2248U] by Martijn Baecke and Matthew Steiner
    The last session on this list and I think it is an important one. How do you evolve as an IT practitioner, what kind of opportunities are out there and what types of skills would you need for those opportunities? Martijn and Matt will guide you through a fast evolving IT world.

That was it for now, enjoy the show. (Early bird tickets will end the 21st of June, so get them now!)

The post Top 25 VMworld US 2019 sessions to attend (or watch online) appeared first on Yellow Bricks.

Posted in 2019, Sessions, Various, vmworld, vmworld us | Comments Off on Top 25 VMworld US 2019 sessions to attend (or watch online)

Top 20 articles for vSAN,May 2019

Status of TLSv1.1/1.2 Enablement and TLSv1.0 Disablement across VMware products Thick-provisioned VMs on vSAN detected on vSAN-health check Virtual Machines running on VMware vSAN 6.6 and later report guest data consistency concerns following a disk extend operation “Host cannot communicate with all other nodes in vSAN enabled cluster” error VASA Provider Registration Troubleshooting vSAN Health

The post Top 20 articles for vSAN,May 2019 appeared first on VMware Support Insider.

Posted in KB Digest, Top 20 | Comments Off on Top 20 articles for vSAN,May 2019