Top 20 articles for vSAN, June 2019

Status of TLSv1.1/1.2 Enablement and TLSv1.0 Disablement across VMware products Thick-provisioned VMs on vSAN detected on vSAN-health check Virtual Machines running on VMware vSAN 6.6 and later report guest data consistency concerns following a disk extend operation vSAN Health Service – Online Health – Controller Utility Is Installed on Host VASA Provider Registration Troubleshooting “Virtual

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VMworld 2019 sessions by the numbers

While looking through the content catalog I thought I would do some searches to see the number of sessions focused on specific products/solutions based on keywords. My observations on the numbers below are the # of sponsor sessions are very small, of the remaining sessions it’s unknown how many came through the public CFP but …

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VMworld 2019 sessions by the numbers

While looking through the content catalog I thought I would do some searches to see the number of sessions focused on specific products/solutions based on keywords. My observations on the numbers below are the # of sponsor sessions are very small, of the remaining sessions it’s unknown how many came through the public CFP but …

Continue reading »

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New KB articles published for the week ending 6th July,2019

VMware ESXi The virtual machine freezes during boot up of the Windows Guest OS Date Published: 3-Jul-19 Unified Access Gateway (and Access Point) workaround for CVE-2019-11477 and CVE-2019-11478 Date Published: 2-Jul-19 Intel® Server System S2600WF Family with Intel® Optane? DC Persistent Memory Module Support Date Published: 1-Jul-19 ERROR: ATTEMPTING TO BACKUP SPBM DATA, PLEASE CHECK

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Self-publishing, where do you start and which tools to use?

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I have had this question a couple of times and typed lengthy emails as a response, I figured I may as well write a blog post and share that going forward. Self-publishing, where do you start and which tools to use?

Well, I think the process is rather simple, but it takes a lot of time. Before you even get started writing a book you need to ask yourself if you will have the time to write a book and if you have the support of your family. As it typically means you will end up sitting in your home office for many evenings, and weekends, typing up content. Without the support of your family, or time, you won’t be able to finish it. Especially when it is your first book, expect it to take 6-9 months. Unless you get time from your work to add in extra hours during the week, and even then it probably takes 6 months at least.

Then there’s the question, self-publishing or a publisher? There are advantages to either, of course with a publisher a cut of the royalties will go to the publisher and typically as an author you will get between 8-12% (with 15% being the upper end). Big benefit of a publisher is the fact that they will provide editors, pay tech reviewers and will do all the formatting for you for both the paper and ebook edition. With self-publishing, you have to do that yourself, but it also means you are in control and you get to determine the price, which is nice as you can for instance price the ebook at 9.99 instead of the 40 USD a publisher will ask. (This will help with volume.)

Now when it comes to self-publishing, how do you start? I would recommend the following:

  1. Write a short summary of what you are going to write about and what you expect the reader to learn from the book
  2. Decide if you want a co-author or not, and ask the co-author if you want one
  3. Create a Table of Content (list of chapters)
  4. Create a timeline for completing the chapters
  5. Think about who you would like to ask as a technical reviewer, you may want more than 1
  6. Think about asking someone for editing/grammar, it helps to have someone focus on pure readability of the content!
  7. Think about which platform you will use to publish, Lulu vs Amazon (KDP) vs ?

Now when you have the above done, you can start writing, but what kind of tools should you use? I personally have used MS Word as the main tool to write books. When working with multiple authors we typically create a file per chapter and divide the chapters between the authors and work on them individually and store them in a shared dropbox folder. When you are done you can simply share the files with reviewers and editors. When you are done, you simply combine all the chapters and create a PDF. Now before you even do, make sure to check the publishing platform you will use and check whether they provide templates or not. These templates will be very helpful when you start the work to create a PDF. Amazon (KDP) will provide you various types of templates for different sized books. Also, when you create a PDF consider buying Adobe Acrobat DC. Not a requirement, but may help to produce usable PDFs, although KDP can also help with this.

The above is the print part, but of course, you may also want to create an ebook, typically this means you will need to redo all the formatting. KDP can do this for you, typically at a cost, or you can do it yourself. I have done this myself for most books (where Frank typically did the formatting for the paper copy), and for the ebook I have used various tools. I have a Macbook and I used both Vellum and Scrivener. Scrivener is a combination of a word processor/authoring tool and an ebook creator. Vellum was purely developed to create clean ebooks. That is why I moved from Scrivener to Vellum, as we do all our writing in MS Word, the only thing I need is the ability to create clean Kindle files. Vellum does that extremely well. It comes at a cost, but it was worth it! I tried importing the MS Word doc by the way various times, but I ended up doing copy/paste in the end, was much easier as it allowed me to also verify the formatting per copy/paste action.

Last but not least the tools used for the diagrams, it doesn’t really matter what you use. Visio, Powerpoint, Omnigraffle, it all works well. As long as you are consistent in terms of style and icons used. I would definitely recommend having one author create, or edit/verify all the diagrams. It just provides a more consistent look and feel and will make your book look more professional.

Before I forget, then of course when you are finished you will need to set a price. Now, when self-publishing I have always released the ebook at a fraction of the cost of the paper book. Simply because it allows you to reach more people, and of course because it is better for the environment. Yet is will cut into your royalties, but if you are considering writing a book to make money then you probably should rethink things. In most cases, tech books won’t make you a lot of money, put in the same amount of hours at the local MacDonalds and you probably make more money, but hopefully that is not what you were trying to achieve. Hopefully, your goal is to learn from the experience, share your knowledge and expand your horizon.

Anyway, if anyone has any questions, feel free to leave a comment.

The post Self-publishing, where do you start and which tools to use? appeared first on Yellow Bricks.

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Top 20 articles for vSphere, June2019

Restarting the Management agents in ESXi Uploading files to a vSphere service might fail “503 service unavailable” error when connecting to the vCenter Server using the vSphere Web Client Investigating virtual machine file locks on ESXi L1TF related “esx.problem.hyperthreading.unmitigated” vCenter Server Updates: CVE-2018-3646 How to reset the lost or forgotten root password in vCenter Server

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Top 20 articles for NSX,June 2019

Status of TLSv1.1/1.2 Enablement and TLSv1.0 Disablement across VMware products vCenter Server or Platform Services Controller certificate validation error for external VMware Solutions in vSphere 6.0 Guest Introspection status reports “Warning: Guest Introspection service not ready” vCenter Server or Platform Services Controller certificate validation error messages for external solutions in environments with a External Platform

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Introduction to Edge Clusters in VMware vCloud Director 9.7 (Part 1 of 3)

Introduction – What is an Edge Cluster?

In this blog post, we will discuss the importance of Edge Cluster capability in VMware vCloud Director (vCD) 9.7. With this new addition, network services for multi-tenant architectures are greatly enhanced and we will be covering these considerations in further detail.

Today in vCloud Director, NSX-V Edge Gateways VMs, or Edge Services Gateways (ESGs), are deployed in a System Resource Pool belonging to an Organization Virtual Data Center (oVDC). These ESGs are the essential function for all virtual network services such as NAT, Edge Firewall, Load Balancing, VPN services, and so forth. In a multi-tenant provider architecture, one strives to ensure all services are highly available to meet stated service level agreements. Edge Cluster capability in 9.7 presents new availability, security, and network hygiene enhancements.

By our definition, an Edge Cluster is a logical construct driving a placement decision of oVDC Edge Services Gateways which consist of a resource pool and a desired storage policy. The Edge Cluster is created by the provider administrator and then assigned to Org VDCs as a primary or secondary (for high availability) instance to the Org VDC Network Profile. Therefore, the deployment of ESGs to Edge Clusters are transparent by nature and analogous to deploying a network from a network pool today.

So why are Edge Clusters important in vCloud Director and why should a provider configure them?

  1. Consumption of dedicated Edge Clusters for North/South traffic – optimized traffic flow while minimizing the span of Layer 2 broadcast traffic. In essence, a provider can control and streamline tenant traffic by utilizing Edge Clusters.
  2. Provide a higher level of availability to Edge nodes that can distinctly fail between two clusters.
  3. Ability to balance organization Edge services between multiple Edge Clusters – I do not have to use the “same” Primary and Secondary Edge Cluster for every org VDC. This can be configured on a per orgVDC basis.

 

Pre-9.7 Edge Capabilities

Previously, starting with version 9.0 of vCD, one could establish an Edge Cluster by configuring metadata on the Provider Virtual Data Center (pVDC) object. Another colleague of mine, Timo Sugliani, did a great overview of the metadata capabilities located here.  However, this presented a few considerations and limitations:

  1. Lack of ability of a custom storage profile – default storage profile from the oVDC was utilized.
  2. Single cluster availability – in the event of cluster failure, no automated failover to a secondary Edge Cluster.
  3. vCD has to use affinity rules to achieve placement while maintaining distinct entities, adding overall complexity to the system and vCD placement.

In 9.7, Edge Cluster is the desired design configuration over placement by metadata configuration. If both solutions are utilized, the Edge Cluster implementation takes precedence over the metadata placement. This is important to note when transitioning from metadata placement to Edge Cluster placement – since this configuration is non-disruptive, we can apply this on a per-oVDC basis and redeploy the tenant Edge(s) during a maintenance window.

While we will continue to support this legacy configuration, a dedicated Edge Cluster presents many new opportunities for a provider.

 

9.7 – Edge Cluster Capabilities

The following are the key functions of Edge Cluster inside of vCD 9.7 –

  1. Management of Edge Clusters – the ability to create and manage Edge Clusters as it pertains to vCD constructs. Edge Clusters are an entirely new construct that is defined inside of the vCD API.
  2. Definition of Primary and Secondary Edge Clusters for oVDCs – we now can stipulate the desired placement of org VDC edges to an Edge Cluster while meeting availability metrics with a secondary location.
  3. Custom storage policy selection – each Edge Cluster can consume a specific storage policy that is originated by the provider administrator inside of vCenter and vCD. The distinct advantage is discrete control of which storage system is utilized by ESG’s.
  4. Isolation of Edge workloads – since ESGs are on dedicated computing infrastructure, we can minimize northbound connectivity to only these specific Edge Clusters. More on that shortly.

In definition, an Edge Cluster constitutes the following:

  1. vCenter Resource Pool Object
  2. Storage Policy (Profile) – from vCenter/vCD
  3. Name and Description

Currently, Edge Cluster instantiation and configuration must be done via the vCD API.

 

New Network Construct in vCloud Director – VDC Network Profile

In vCD 9.7, we are introducing a new organization VDC specific construct – VDC Network Profile.

Within a VDC Network Profile, one has the ability to establish provider networking resources within this organization VDC (oVDC). Going forward, every oVDC will have a default Network Profile attached to it. This is where we configure the use and consumption of distinct Edge Clusters.

In the below screenshot, we can see a VDC that has specific network properties available – “primaryEdgeCluster” and “secondaryEdgeCluster.”

With 9.7, a VDC Network Profile has the ability to utilize a Primary and Secondary Edge Cluster in an NSX-V backed oVDC object. More on the distinct differences between Primary and Secondary Edge Clusters.

The end goal is the ability to continue to advance Network Profile services available on a per oVDC basis.

 

Establishing Edge Clusters and Applicability to Organization VDCs

Above a high-level view of the steps for instantiating an Edge Cluster inside of a vCD instance. Our next blog post will review this in a step by step configuration. However, we wanted to provide a view on how this looks from a relational mapping perspective.

Below, we can see how the JSON body is formulated on each Edge Cluster (under the /cloudapi/1.0.0/edgeCluster API path) while each Tenant oVDC has a “/networkProfile” now available for configuration.

While this provides a provider the flexibility to specify a primary and secondary Edge Cluster configuration on a per-oVDC basis, this does not necessarily mean it must be the *same* primary and secondary instance each time. Therefore, one could have something like the following –

In the above example, Tenant 3 oVDC has its primaryEdgeCluster associated to “RegionA01-EDGE02” while the secondaryEdgeCluster is associated to “RegionA01-EDGE01.” What’s unique is the ability to essentially load balance Edge resources at a very granular level. Moreover, we could have up to ten (10) Edge Clusters registered to a vCD instance, so many more permutations could be constructed from this overall approach.

What’s Next?

In the next blog post, we will review a step by step guide on registering two Edge Clusters to a vCD instance while configuring a oVDC to consume these new Edge Cluster resources.

By Daniel Paluszek and Abhinav Mishra

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New KB articles published for the week ending 29th June,2019

VMware Cloud on AWS Dell EMC Avamar 19.1 for VMware Cloud on AWS Date Published: 27-Jun-19 VMware NSX-T Unable to add a L2VPN stretched Logical Switch to a Logical Router Date Published: 23-Jun-19 VMware NSX-T Data Center NSX-T upgrade on ESXi hosts fails at 40% in environments running containers Date Published: 28-Jun-19 VMware PKS How

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New KB articles published for the week ending 22nd June,2019

Datacenter Database compatibility and upgrade path for VMware Products Date Published: 22-Jun-19 VMware Horizon Add Registry settings for Wan Optimization for USB redirected Wacom signature pad devices Date Published: 17-Jun-19 VMware Horizon Client for Mac OS X The Yubikey smart card authentication does not work when connecting to remote agent Date Published: 17-Jun-19 VMware Horizon

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